Saturday, November 1, 2014

Why I Wrote the Book

Once upon a time (if I'm going to tell you about my fairy tale novel, I might as well start properly), my husband and I were on a road trip. As was often the case before we had kids and the car became too noisy, I was reading a book aloud. This particular trip, the book was DEALING WITH DRAGONS by Patricia C. Wrede.

I, of course, had read this book several times before, but this was my husband's first experience with it. Two things came of this particular read-through:

  1. We decided to name our first daughter Cimorene (a year later, we did).
  2. I had a realization that led to writing the novel chosen this summer as an alternate in Brenda Drake's Pitch Wars contest. 
The realization was this: Princess Cimorene, the heroine of Wrede's book, is a tall, dark-haired, kick-butt princess. This was unusual for the time this book was written (published in 1990). Now, however, nearly 25 years later, nearly every princess you see is what I call an "empowered" princess. They're all out beating the villains and saving kingdoms. 

Now, I relate to a lot of these princesses; I've always been stubborn and adventurous, and I may have kicked a little butt here and there. But the trope-breaker has become its own trope. So it's time to break it again.

In my book A FROG, A WHISTLE, AND A VIAL OF SAND, Princess Ellean is considered old-fashioned because she has blond hair, blue eyes, and likes needlework. When her parents kick her out of the castle, the adventure she's always dreaded leads her to the love and friendships she's always needed. But with kidnappings and a sorcerer along the way, surviving long enough for happily-ever-after will require all the skills she does have--including embroidery.

As an alternate, my pitch and first 250 words will be put in a showcase November 6th where agents have been invited to browse and make requests. Wish me (and Princess Ellean) luck! Also, check out some of the other books that were selected for the contest. There are some I definitely hope to read. 





Tracie Martin: WILD IS THE WIND







































21 comments:

  1. This is exactly the kind of book my daughter would love. I'll be watching for it on her behalf.

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    1. Thanks! It's very tongue-in-cheek, and was a lot of fun to write.

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  2. Oh, this sounds like it's a very funny read. Best of luck with it!

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  3. "But the trope-breaker has become its own trope. So it's time to break it again." YES! That! Good luck in Pitch Wars!

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    1. Thanks! I can't wait to read everyone else's posts as well.

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  4. Sounds exciting! I loved hearing the story! Wishing lots of luck! :)

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    1. Thanks Lindsey! I'm hopeful that Ellean can find a home.

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  5. The 10-year-old girl in me wants to read this right now. :) Good luck to you in Pitch Wars!

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    1. Thanks! So many of us have that little girl inside us still... This book has actually gotten the stamp of approval from a couple of 18-yo boys too, though. That was pretty exciting. :-) Hopefully I can find an agent and editor who love it just as much.

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  6. I want to read this. I love the embroidery aspect. :)

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  7. This sounds fabulous! I, too, love embroidery and love that you named your daughter Cimorene! :)

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    1. Thanks! We can always tell "our people" when they ask us if our daughter is a dragon-loving princess. :-)

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  8. Oh! I LOVE this pitch! It sounds like so much fun, and I love how you're turning a new trope on its head yet again. Good luck with it!!!

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    1. Thank you! Hopefully we'll find this reluctant princess a home.

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  9. Thank you soooo much for posting this. I've been trying to remember the name of this book for YEARS.

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